Sunday, April 18, 2010

Belief in government (lies) is always a sin, no?

Ender’s Game in Real Time

by Ron Shirtz
by Ron Shirtz
Recently by Ron Shirtz: Constitutional Litmus Test

Orson Scott Card’s prescient futuristic novel, Ender’s game, tells the story of an extremely intellectually gifted young boy, Ender Wiggin, who at the age of six is enrolled in Command School, a military academy of the best and brightest youth of Earth. He becomes an unwitting weapon in mankind’s war against the Formics, an alien race commonly referred as the "Buggers."

Ender is both ostracized by his peers and admired as a brilliant strategist, a situation fostered by his teachers to develop his creativity and his leadership abilities. His war training becomes all-inclusive – Daily he must defend himself from jealous, bullying classmates and outwit manipulative teachers. Dink, one of his few friends tells him; "It’s the teachers, they’re the enemy. They get us to fight each other, to hate each other. The game is everything. Win win win. It amounts to nothing." (p. 108)

Ender is constantly engaged in an ongoing series of war games to exploit his intelligence towards military tactics. Each one becomes more challenging than the next, pushing the young Ender to his limits.

At one point, Ender questions the reason of the conflict with Colonel Graff:

"So the whole war is because we can't talk to each other."

"If the other fellow can't tell you his story, you can never be sure he isn't trying to kill you."

"What if we just left them alone?"

"Ender, we didn't go to them first, they came to us. If they were going to leave us alone, they could have done it a hundred years ago, before the First Invasion."

"Maybe they didn't know we were intelligent life. Maybe – " (p.178)

Colonel Graff convinces Ender that there can be no negotiating with the inscrutable Buggers, that the war is a Darwinian battle for survival of one competing species against another.

In a final test, he is given a computer simulation to fight through the Bugger’s defenses and destroy their home world planet with a devastating bomb. Against tremendous odds, he succeeds – Only to discover afterwards from his adult mentors that it was not a simulation.

At age 12, Ender discovers he has single-handedly committed genocide of an entire planet.

"Real. Not a game. Ender’s mind was too tired to cope with it all. They weren’t just points of light in the air, they were real ships that he had fought with and real ships he had destroyed. And a real world that he had blasted into oblivion. He walked through the crowd, dodging their congratulations, ignoring their hands, their words, their rejoicing.."

"….. I killed them all, didn’t I? Ender asked.

"All who?" asked Graff. "The buggers? That was the idea."

Mazer leaned in close. "That’s what the war was for."

"All their Queens. So I killed all their children, all of everything."

"They decided that when they attacked us. It wasn’t your fault. It’s had to happen."

Ender grabbed Mazer’s uniform and hung unto it, pulling him down so they were face to face. "I didn’t want to kill them all. I didn’t want to kill anybody! I’m not a killer!…You but you made me do it, you tricked me into it!" He was crying. He was out of control.

"Of course we tricked you. That’s the whole point," said Graff. (p.208)

Predator drones are a progressive example of current military technology blurring the distinction between real and the digitally contrived. These technological terrors desensitize the inherent human aversion to violence by reverting harsh reality into an entertaining simulation. Such technology encourages a delusional mindset that killing in war can be sanitized, without the unpleasant experience of suffering the emotions of remorse or revulsion. Someone once said, "The first casualty of war is truth." The Government knows this, and seeks to hide this unpleasant truth from public. Examples include the previously suppressed 2007 Apache attack video of the killing of two Reuter journalists, the Pentagon’s censorship of pictures of flag-draped coffins returning from Iraq, and Defense secretary Robert Gates criticism of the published photo of the Lance Corporal Joshua Bernard dying in combat. "Why your organization would purposely defy the family's wishes knowing full well that it will lead to yet more anguish is beyond me." demands Mr. Gates of the AP Press. Perhaps if Mr. Gates and the rest of the Government had read Joseph’s Heller’s novel, Catch 22, he would understand war’s terrible secret, as Heller’s protagonist Captain Yossarian grimly discovers:

Snowden was wounded inside his flak suit. Yossarian ripped open the snaps of Snowden’s flak suit and heard himself scream wildly as Snowden’s insides slithered down to the floor in a soggy pile and just kept dripping out. A chunk of flak more than three inches big had shot into his other side just underneath the arm and blasted all the way through, drawing whole mottled quarts of Snowden along with it through the gigantic hole in his ribs it made as it blasted out. Yossarian screamed a second time and squeezed both hands over his eyes. His teeth were chattering in horror. He forced himself to look again. Here was God’s plenty, all right, he thought bitterly as he stared – liver, lungs, kidneys, ribs, stomach and bits of the stewed tomatoes Snowden had eaten that day for lunch. Yossarian hated stewed tomatoes and turned away dizzily and began to vomit, clutching his burning throat. The tail gunner woke up while Yossarian was vomiting, saw him, and fainted again.

Yossarian was limp with exhaustion, pain and despair when he finished. He turned back weakly to Snowden, whose breath had grown softer and more rapid, and whose face had grown paler. He wondered how in the world to begin to save him.

"I’m cold." Snowden whimpered, "I’m cold."

"There, there. Yossarian mumbled mechanically in a voice too low to be heard. "There, there."

Yossarian was cold, too, and shivering uncontrollable. He felt goose pimples clacking all over him as he gazed down despondently at the grim secret Snowden had spilled all over the messy floor. It was easy to read the message in his entrails. Man was matter, that was Snowden’s secret. Drop him out a window and he’ll fall. Set fire to him and he’ll burn. Bury him and he’ll rot, like other kinds of garbage. The spirit gone, man is garbage. That was Snowden’s secret. Ripeness was all.

(Catch 22, Joseph Heller, chapter 41)

It is not my intent to write a screed on the moral evils of video games, or advocate we devolve into to Luddites. I only desire for the clueless to experience a second-hand Yossarian-epiphany by reading history and literature, like the books referenced here. To disabuse the notion that State-sponsored violence is necessary to safeguard ideals such as country and honor. To rediscover the lost truth that war is truly terrible, lest we, as Robert E. Lee warned, "should grow too fond of it."

April 17, 2010

Ron Shirtz [send him mail] is a transplanted Californian teaching Graphic Communications in Northern (Not "Upstate") New York. His hobbies include arranging deck chairs on sinking ships, tilting at windmills, and being fashionably late.

Monday, April 12, 2010

More confirmation of the State as anti-Christ (violence instead of love)

Why Politics Is Not the Answer

by James Ostrowski
by James Ostrowski

Recently by James Ostrowski: A Strategy Manual for the Liberty Movements

This is Chapter 3 of Direct Citizen Action: How We Can Win the Second American Revolution Without Firing a Shot

“He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight.”

~ Sun Tzu

There are three basic approaches to changing public policy: politics (elections and lobbying), direct citizen action and violence. We can quickly rule out violence as morally repugnant, inefficient and unpredictable.

Political action has rarely in human history caused government to shrink in size and power. The natural tendency of government is to grow and expand its powers. The events of 2008–2010 illustrate that. Over time, it will tend to tax and spend more, hire more people and assume more power over our lives, liberty and property. Government policies change continually but if you look closely, it is almost always in the direction of bigger government. If you favor bigger government, you really don’t have to do anything. Just sit back and enjoy the show. By the natural laws of politics, governments will tend to grow. If you check back in five years, it is highly likely that the government will be bigger and more powerful. Government in America has grown enormously since about 1917, the start of American involvement in World War I. No coincidence there; war grows the state.

By its nature, the state is the means by which some people can impose the costs of achieving their goals onto unwilling others. As Frédéric Bastiat put it, “Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else.” The desire to impose costs on others is virtually limitless. Thus, governments tend to grow over time.

There are five main reasons for this which are, unfortunately, structural features of political life:

  1. rational apathy – the incentive some people have to increase the size of the state outweighs the incentive the rest of us have to fight them;
  2. government control over political ideas – the state uses its control over schools and other idea-disseminating institutions to propagate support for further government growth;
  3. government creates its own demand – because the state’s various interventions into the market economy always fail (e.g., health care), ironically, they increase the demand of the uninformed majority for even further interventions to fix the problems caused by the prior interventions;
  4. the productivity of the mixed economy – given the inherent tendency of the state to grow, only extreme dissatisfaction among the populace will rouse them to act; however, even a partially free market produces enough wealth to mollify the people;
  5. government has a monopoly on the use of legal force – government grows because it can. Given the universal human desire to accomplish goals with the least possible exertion, politicians have an irresistible urge to use the state’s powers to continually expand the amount of wealth they control. Anyone who objects can always appeal to the politicians’ judges and can expect to be told, “Get lost!”

Since it is in the structural DNA of government to grow, it is nearly impossible to persuade its officials to reverse that tendency or to persuade the voters to elect candidates who intend to shrink government. The last time a mass political movement was able to achieve power and shrink government was Thomas Jefferson’s velvet revolution of 1800!

Ron Paul’s campaign for president in 2007–8 showed how difficult it is to elect a candidate who favors smaller government. In spite of over 100,000 campaign workers and $30,000,000 and an articulate candidate with 20 years in Congress and a sterling personal life and record of accomplishment, he received less than ten percent in every Republican primary election. The system is thoroughly stacked against anyone who would attempt to reform it from within.

The main function of national elections in this country is to give the people the illusion that they are in charge and can change policy whenever necessary. However, the basic policies never seem to change. Elections allow people to blow off steam and thus serve as a safety valve for the regime that allows them to rule us for another four years.

With respect to the upcoming congressional elections this year, a Patriot candidate would need as much as two million dollars to run a competitive race for the House. Very few have that kind of money or can raise it. More likely, the Republican challengers this year will be party loyalists funded and controlled by the plutocrats and GOP establishment.

I know these are harsh realities to accept. They contradict what we have been taught in school and told to believe in endless TV ads urging us to vote and participate in the political process. However, to win this fight, you will have to be as clear-eyed as our adversaries are about the realities of power politics. That’s how the political class got all that power in the first place: by seeing things clearly and not being fooled by myths and clichés.

April 12, 2010

James Ostrowski is an attorney in Buffalo, New York and author of Political Class Dismissed: Essays Against Politics, Including "What’s Wrong With Buffalo." His latest book is Direct Citizen Action: How We Can Win the Second American Revolution Without Firing a Shot. See his website.

Friday, April 09, 2010

Chuck Baldwin, candidate for public office (Oh, my)

Saving Souls--Losing Freedom
By Chuck Baldwin
April 9, 2010

This column is archived at

One would have to be a blind man to not see that America is fast losing the
fundamental principles of liberty upon which our once-great country was
established. And, without a doubt, the single biggest reason for this
decline is the lack of concern and effort on the part of today's Christians
and pastors to resist it.

All over America, when one approaches our pastors and church leaders with
the obvious decay and ruination of constitutional government and Declaration
principles taking place in our land today, the response flippantly comes
back: "God hasn't called me to do that; I'm supposed to win souls and that's
it." (Or words to that effect.) As if the call to Gospel preaching,
evangelism, and missionary endeavor negates our responsibility as citizens
of a free land.

Of course, this call to "win souls" doesn't interfere with these preachers'
golf games; it doesn't interfere with their family vacations; it doesn't
interfere with their active membership in whatever local civil organization
they happen to belong to; it doesn't interfere with their hiring of a lawyer
if they are falsely accused or defrauded; it doesn't interfere with their
invitations to celebrity politicians for special church recognition on
patriotic holidays; it doesn't interfere with them going to the polls to
vote; it only seems to interfere when they are personally asked to take a
stand in the gap for our country's liberties. Then, all of a sudden, they
haven't been "called," or "God will take care of it," or "Jesus is coming
soon," or "Religion and politics don't mix," ad infinitum, ad nauseam.

As a result of America's preachers' indifference (and that of the Christians
they influence), our country is on the brink of becoming an oppressive and
tyrannical state. No, let me rephrase that. America is already in the
process of becoming an oppressive and tyrannical state. And it's the
preachers' fault!

For some, it is a matter of ignorance (I think "willful ignorance" is more
appropriate). For some, it is a matter of convenience. For some, it is
comfort. For some, it is ambition. Whatever the reason, America's preachers
are contributing to the collapse of the greatest free country the world has
ever known--all in the name of saving souls.

What these preachers seemingly do not comprehend is that when the hammer
falls on liberty in this country, it is going to FALL RIGHT ON TOP OF
THEM--HARD. There is no mistaking it: when oppression's hammer strikes,
Gospel preachers and Bible believers will be the anvil. And when it happens,
it will not matter that a preacher was popular, or was likeable, or was
non-controversial, or was compassionate, or was a Moose or Elk club member,
or had a big church, or was a friend of the governor, or had "Law
Enforcement Appreciation Day" in his church every year, or that he was
sought out by political candidates for his endorsement. None of that will
matter to a tinker's dam. The boot of state oppression will squash him like
a bug! It will not spare him, his wife, his children, his health, his
finances, or his feelings. And, ladies and gentlemen, at this very moment,
we are not very far away from the hammer falling.

I have just recently come across an official document from one of our war
colleges that is downright frightening. I will expose this document during
my Sunday morning address, which is livestreamed on the Internet, this
Sunday, April 11, 2010, at 10:30 a.m., Central Daylight Time. To watch this
address, go here:

As I read over this document (and the chill bumps began rising all over my
body), I thought of all those preachers out there who have purposely refused
to engage the body politic on behalf of freedom's principles; those who
refused to take a stand for the Constitution and Bill of Rights; those who
took the path of least resistance and refused to be controversial; those who
put money and success before honor and right; those who meekly looked the
other way while George W. Bush (and other neocons) dismantled constitutional
government (and had John McCain been elected and was doing much of what
Barack Obama is currently doing--which he would have been--they would still
be looking the other way); those who claimed to be "too busy" to worry about
politics; and those who thought that somehow their Christian duty did not
include freedom's fight. What they do not realize is that they, themselves,
are in the crosshairs. While they are making a hundred excuses for not
actively helping to defend freedom principles, the enemy--after having
eradicated the constitutional protections of our liberties--will jump on
Gospel preachers and Bible believers "like a chicken on a June bug," as my
dad used to say. I am personally convinced that the plans for Christian (and
patriot) persecution are already in place.

As I read the above-referenced document (which I will expose this Sunday
morning), many things--including the now-infamous MIAC report that most
readers should already be very familiar with--began to make sense. And so
did those reports of FEMA camps that we have all heard so much about, and
maybe even the raid on the Hutaree "Christian" militia.

And does anyone really believe that those pastors who will not jeopardize
their social standing or retirement programs in order to be faithful to the
truth are going to miraculously grow backbones when serious persecution
comes? Get real! These timid trumpeters piously extol the ancient example of
Daniel's courage in rebelling against the unlawful command of his king;
praise the Three Hebrew Children who would not bow to the image of
Nebuchadnezzar; and commend Simon Peter for defiantly telling Jewish
authorities, "We ought to obey God rather than men"--while, at the same
time, quoting Romans 13 to justify their own cowardice and indifference.

It is no hyperbole to say that preachers who ignore and avoid the freedom
fight do so at their own peril.

At this point, it might be helpful to remember Winston Churchill's challenge
to England's citizens: "If you will not fight for the right when you can
easily win without bloodshed; if you will not fight when your victory will
be sure and not too costly; you may come to the moment when you will have to
fight with all the odds against you and only a precarious chance of
survival. There may even be a worse case. You may have to fight when there
is no hope of victory, because it is better to perish than to live as

I invite readers to tune in to my Sunday address this Sunday, April 11,
2010, at approximately 10:30 a.m., Central Daylight Time, as I expose this
disturbing document from one of America's war colleges. Believe me, what I
am going to expose has serious implications for every Christian, every
freedom lover, and every American citizen who believes in an independent
United States.

To watch the broadcast live this Sunday, April 11, at 10:30 a.m. (CDT), go

I wrote back to him thusly:

Dear Chuck,

I'm sure I have said this to you before, but here it is again. One cannot be a "citizen" of ANY nation and be a follower of God. There is no wiggle-room on this. ALL nations (earthly) are representations of the devil. They all promise what they obviously cannot deliver HOWEVER "free' they (say they) are. GOD ALONE answers prayer. To Him go all thanks and all honors. Do you know of any earthly nation that has never murdered its "own" or any of God's creatures? No? I thought not. Is YOUR God Love? Mine is and does not visit murder on His people. The Beast does, though. Why would you consider yourself part of that? Easy way to tell Love from hate: hate uses force/coercion (government) and Love uses persuasion. Am I making sense yet? You are caught inside a mental box. Escape to God-given freedom. It can only cost you your life. Going along to get along will surely cost you your soul. Christ offers you a sword that cuts without harming and ennobles those who wield it. Its name is non-violence/civil disobedience. It entails action on your part in behalf of those most likely to feel the heel of oppression. Bonhoeffer, lately, taught this. Christ, earlier, said love thy neighbor as yourself. Love is NOT a passive activity. "Let goods and kindred go, this mortal life also, the body they may kill. God's truth abideth still. His Kingdom is forever." - Luther
You are certainly right about the "Church Profession" industry. They suck off the production of people and promise what they do not personally have - salvation. One must follow Christ's example to achieve that. They deliver compliant sheeple to the slaughter - in other words, citizens of one (earthly) nation or another, played off against other "nations" by greedy men and women whose only thought on earth is earthly wealth. These lost souls "win' no matter what "side" wins or loses. Sheeple lose all sides of this battle, souls included. Are the 'preachers' responsible? Yes and no. We all answer to our God as individuals. No Nuremberg defense to our Maker, please.

John Boanerges Redman

Thursday, April 08, 2010

My recent 'argument' with a weighty Quaker

As an debater, IMHO, this guy is a typical liberal lightweight and, of course, a hypocrite. He was, throughout, condescending and wrong, but YOU decide for yourself. It started with a editorial he wrote which made a point IF one supports war. He then sent it on to the ATlanta Friends discussion list. Bragging I could not let alone. I'll now lay it out, starting with his editorial:

WE THE PEOPLE: Our troops deserve better treatment

By XXX XXXXXX / Chronicle contributor
A recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that large numbers of soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, and other mental health disorders. These symptoms often go untreated and lead to violent episodes when the soldiers return home from combat duty.

The problem the military has in confronting psychiatric problems is longstanding. Unless there is a dramatic change in the military's use of mental health treatments there will be more tragic violence as our troops return from war with serious psychiatric disorders.

Unfortunately, instead of making the needed changes to improve the quality of psychiatric services, the military has recently announced plans to paper over the problem by providing our troops with superficial new mental health treatments that could prove very harmful, especially when applied to the severe psychiatric disturbances caused by military combat duty.

With the current number of soldier suicides and cases of post-traumatic stress disorder reaching all time highs the pressure has increased on the military to address the mental health needs of the troops. Last year alone, more than 330 serving members of the US armed forces committed suicide.

One would expect that to help address this problem the military would turn to experts in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Instead, the military has developed a $119 million program to train 1.1 million American troops in the techniques of "Positive Psychology" that emphasizes substituting positive thoughts for unhappy or negative ones.

In announcing the new military program, Dr. Martin Seligman, the developer of Positive Psychology, said that "Psychology has given us this whole language of pathology, so that a soldier in tears after seeing someone killed thinks, 'Something's wrong with me; I have post-traumatic stress,' or PTSD. The idea here is to give people a new vocabulary, to speak in terms of resilience. Most people who experience trauma don't end up with PTSD; many experience post-traumatic growth."

It is difficult for me to understand how anyone familiar with post traumatic stress disorder in the military could make such a statement. PTSD, once referred to as "shell shock," occurs in soldiers who have experienced the horrors of war to such intensity that they psychologically crack.

In PTSD, victims are subjected to such overwhelming and horrible emotional trauma that they are unable to regain stability with typical psychological coping mechanisms. Instead, the rattled mind is driven into uncontrollable and rapidly changing, emotionally painful states. Night terrors, panic attacks, depression, and mental confusion occur in chaotic fashion in the helpless victims. It is not a mental state that can be treated by suggesting to the patient that he or she simply think positively about the situation, as Dr. Seligman suggests. His approach may work with minor stress experienced in civilian life but is unproven in cases of major traumatic stress experienced during war.

And yet the US military has bought into this untested notion to the tune of $119 million. This money, of course, could have been used to provide real mental health care to our troops. Instead, it is being used to tell military personnel that they can overcome whatever happens to them on the battlefield by using the power of positive thinking. Can you imagine telling a soldier that he needs to find the positive side of having seen his buddy blown to bits?

Our troops have been through enough. While most Americans have contributed very little to the war effort, other than to adorn their cars with decals that proclaim their support for the troops, we have subjected them to multiple deployments which none anticipated when they enlisted. They went into battle with inadequate armor. They have watched their buddies die. We have left the families of the troops without adequate support. We have caused their civilian careers to evaporate and let their businesses fail. Those who support war should be willing to pay an extra war tax to pay for it instead of borrowing billions from China and passing the bill onto our children and grandchildren.

Now, when our troops seek mental health care because their minds are like terrifying roller coaster rides, because of what they have experienced in combat, we are going to respond to their PTSD by telling them to be positive and turn their trauma into a “growth experience.” Our troops deserve better than this.

The best thing we can do for our soldiers is to keep them from sacrificing themselves unnecessarily. We are winding down the war in Iraq and its time to end the war in Afghanistan. Our costly military operation in Afghanistan is chasing a phantom. Al-Queda has already left Afghanistan for many other parts of the world. We are dealing with a highly dispersed global network that defies conventional military operations concentrated in a single nation. Tell the President and Congress to bring our soldiers home and provide the best possible care for those who suffer from the physical and psychological wounds of war. It is our responsibility to stop the war in Afghanistan from dragging on indefinitely. We owe this to our troops.

OK, I wrote to him:
Just so you get some perspective,XXX, you state worshiping idolater, HERE are the typical "soldiers" of the largest terrorist organization the world has yet seen calmly murdering people and blaming THEM. And YOU, you tax-paying apologist for Obama and his ilk are worried about treating them AFTER they "see their buddies gruesomely killed". Well, how about worrying about BEFORE they get lured by the tax-funded pay and "benefits" you help wave in front of their faces. How about the near total acceptance of government as a so-called "positive force" in the world of God's making. Thou hypocrite, thou pathetic 'do-gooder', thou public pray-er, sleep well in your scrapbook of letters to the editor. Sophie and Hans have nothing on you, do they?

A bit hash, but we have a history which you see in his reply:

Hello John. I see you are your old bombastic self. You need to understand that I am living in a rural area that is largely populated by fundamentalists who love the military. My column was written to show how the military is damaging their sons and daughters and to try to get them to start questioning the war in Afghanistan. You prefer to yell at people who disagree with you. I prefer to try to reason with them.

Of course, there is nothing in his piece to ask people to "question the war", so, I said:

XXX, you are starting at the wrong end, IMHO. Christ did not accept any government but God's though he loved all the sinners as persons. By trying to dress the beast with nicer velvet gloves you do disservice to all the victims of the anti-Christ. You do,XXX, you do. Get right with God and let His people see your lead. As HDT suggested, be a majority of one. Your letter only asks that government policy toward its expended 'bullets' be made 'more nicer'. Yes, that would help the housemates and coworkers of these damaged persons but still is only means to an end. The means still amounts to more theft from the people who lose more though less visibly. Getting back to the 'damaged bullets', every single one of those, my son included, is damaged from the day of entering service (to the beast). Rotten parenting (guilty), rotten churches (with american flags in the "sanctuary"), rotten preachers and wrong-headed pacifists who think that working within the system will improve it. Do you deny supporting Obama? No, you can't but think that by avoiding discussing it that it isn't important. The path to following Christ is a narrow one and involves risk to your person and fortune. It involves disrobing yourself of nationality and loyalties to 'of this world' distractions. It involves stop paying taxes and getting permission from government to live. GOD gives you permission. None other is needed. It means being in their face, too, as being a peace worker means non-violent resistance to tyranny. "Bombastic"? I think not.

PS. Did you WATCH that Wikileaks film clip? Did you listen to those non-PTSD so-called humans banter about murder? (No, he didn't)

I then sent him THIS:

Dear Joe,

More about those poor neglected "soldiers" (murderers):

Obama’s War: Death to Women and Children, Cover-Ups to Protect the US Killers

Mon, 04/05/2010 - 15:47 — dlindorff

So finally the truth comes out...sort of.

After initially claiming that two pregnant women and a teenage girl killed in a US Special Forces raid on an Afghan home in Khataba in February had been discovered bound and slain by the Americans, the US military has admitted that they were actually shot and killed by those US troops--who then tried to cover up their “mistake” by carving the bullets out of the bodies with knives, removing other incriminating bullets from the compound’s walls, and then washing away the bloody evidence with alcohol.

In this new grisly version of the story issued from the US command in Afghanistan, it was a case of the Special Forces Unit lying to superiors about what had transpired in their botched raid, which also killed an Afghan police commander and a government prosecutor.

The only reason we know all this today is because of the intrepid digging by a relentless reporter from the Times of London, Jerome Starkey, who, unlike the hacks in Kabul passing themselves off as journalists from American news organizations, didn’t just accept the press release on the incident put out by Gen. Stanley McChrystal’s office, but instead did his own investigation, talking to Afghan and UN investigators, as well as local people where the incident happened.

For his efforts at getting to the truth, Starkey was attacked by the US military, accused of lying and misrepresenting US statements.

Now that Starkey has been fully vindicated, there has been no apology from McChrystal’s office, or from the military public relations operation. Nor have US reporters and editors, who left Starkey undefended while his credibility was being attacked by the US, said anything about his role in bringing the truth to light.

The New York Times, in an article today by Richard A. Oppel, Jr., datelined Kabul, said that the US military, “after initially denying involvement in any cover-up in the deaths,” had “admitted that its forces had killed the women during the nighttime raid.”

The paper also credited the Times of London (without mentioning Starkey), with, a day before the military’s about face, disclosing that American forces on the scene had “dug bullets out of their victims’ bodies in the bloody aftermath” and then “washed the wounds with alcohol before lying to their superiors about what happened.”

What the paper didn’t mention is that Starkey had broken the story weeks earlier, only have his exposé ignored by the US media, which allowed him to be slandered by the American military.

This story is not over yet, either.

The US military, incredibly, is still claiming that despite an official investigation by US/NATO personnel into the incident, “Nothing pointed conclusively to the fact that our guys were the ones who tampered with the scene.” As Oppel demurely observed, “However, given that Special Operations forces killed the women, it was not clear why anyone else would have a motivation to remove bullets from the bodies or tamper with evidence at the scene.”

It would appear that a cover-up is still underway.

There has been no talk of bring charges against the Special Forces personnel who committed these killings and who then sought to cover up their actions, or those who were with them who allowed this crime to be committed and didn’t report it.

It is worth pointing out that Gen. McChrystal’s background is running Special Forces operations. He ran a major death squad operation in Iraq before being put in charge of the Afghan War, and was widely reported to be planning to repeat that tactic in Afghanistan. This particular night raid, on what was thought to be a Taliban household, but which turned out to be a party for the naming of a new baby boy, was almost certainly part of just such a mission.

The point to be taken from this ugly window on American operations in Afghanistan is that far from being an aberration, this is precisely how the war is being fought. Had this raid not been based on bad information, so that instead of killing a police officer and a prosecutor, the Special Forces hit-men had actually taken out a Taliban fighter or two, the fact that they also slaughtered a few pregnant women and a girl would have gone unnoticed and unremarked. In fact, the Special Forces killers wouldn’t have even bothered to try to cover up their handiwork by digging knives into the victims’ bodies to gouge out their bullets.

We can safely assume that this kind of thing is going on all over Afghanistan every day.

Welcome to Obama’s War.

Editorial Comment:

Once again, we need to make the point that while individual soldiers in the US military may behave in a heroic fashion on occasion, there is nothing heroic about our military these days. If you want proof of that, just check out the Wikileaks tape, just released over the strenuous efforts of the Pentagon to hide it for the past three years, of a helicopter crew in Iraq mowing down 12 unarmed Iraqis, including two Reuters photographers, and joking about the slaughter as they do it. There is no threat. They are way up in the air, firing 30 mm rounds with abandon. There is a lust to finish off one wounded man trying to crawl away from the scene, as there is a lust to blow away some samaritans in a van who stop and try to help the victim.

America's wars are obscene slaughters, in which the US kills from a distance, sometimes, thanks to robotic drone aircraft, even thousands of miles away from danger.

Our soldiers are hardly the "heroes" that our government and our media automatically refer to them all as. They are armed gangsters, sent out to enforce US hegemony over desperately poor societies, and their basic strategy is to spread fear and terror in hopes of isolating those few who dare to fight back against absurd odds from the general public. Of course, the majority of US military personnel are also victims--victims of poor education, victims of an economic system that leaves many without any opportunity other than military enlistment, victims of propaganda, and victims of recruiters' lies. But for all that they are not heroes.

The heroes are those few who realize what they are being ordered to do and who refuse, they are those who report on the crimes of their fellow soldiers and especially their commanders. And there are not enough of them.

THIS is his idea of answering me:

Dear John,
We have to remember that there is that of God in everyone---even soldiers and government officials. We cannot reach out to the God within them if we hate them. We are called by Christ to love our enemies.

To which I replied:

Dear XXX,

As usual I am not listened to. Please actually read what I have written to you so that you are not so ready to preach to me. I don't need it. Christ did NOT tell us to love the forms of government. Loving the individual, furthermore, does NOT mean agreeing with what they do with their lives. Finding common ground with them does NOT mean paying their salary. So STOP it XXX. STOP being a shill for the murderers. ANSWER what I say to you with argument not pap, XXX. Show me how Christ told us to pay for murder. I will prove to you the opposite. Prove, XXX, I will PROVE it. Then there is the Testimony of Integrity you can read by Wilmer A Cooper (Pendle Hill Pamphlet 296). All your wishy-washy backsliding IS the broad road to destruction. I may not be smarter than you, XXX, but I am NOT fooled by lies. I guess that makes me wiser.

PS. So, you did NOT look at that Wikileaks video because it might make you question your liberal, worldly conceptions. What a waste of intellect.

An idiot would have done better than THIS reply:

Render on to is not government that is bad. It is the control of government by corporations that corrupts it. The problem with America is that the military-industrial complex controls our government. Fight the corporations, not the government.

Is that lightweight? I think so, so, I gave him the condensed version:

Glad you said that. I was WAITING for you to make that mistake. BTW, I hate corporations TOO. Read the following. I don't think you will, you are sooooo sure of yourself.

Render Unto Caesar: A Most Misunderstood New Testament Passage

by Jeffrey F. Barr
by Jeffrey F. Barr


Christians have traditionally interpreted the famous passage "Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar's; and to God, the things that are God's," to mean that Jesus endorsed paying taxes. This view was first expounded by St. Justin Martyr in Chapter XVII of his First Apology, who wrote,

And everywhere we, more readily than all men, endeavor to pay to those appointed by you the taxes both ordinary and extraordinary, as we have been taught by Him; for at that time some came to Him and asked Him, if one ought to pay tribute to Caesar; and He answered, ‘Tell Me, whose image does the coin bear?’ And they said, ‘Caesar’s.’

The passage appears to be important and well-known to the early Christian community. The Gospels of St. Matthew, St. Mark, and St. Luke recount this "Tribute Episode" nearly verbatim. Even Saying 100 of non-canonical Gospel of Thomas and Fragment 2 Recto of the Egerton Gospel record the scene, albeit with some variations from the Canon.

But by His enigmatic response, did Jesus really mean for His followers to provide financial support (willingly or unwillingly) to Tiberius Caesar – a man, who, in his personal life, was a pedophile, a sexual deviant, and a murderer and who, as emperor, claimed to be a god and oppressed and enslaved millions of people, including Jesus’ own? The answer, of course, is: the traditional, pro-tax interpretation of the Tribute Episode is simply wrong. Jesus never meant for His answer to be interpreted as an endorsement of Caesar’s tribute or any taxes.

This essay examines four dimensions of the Tribute Episode: the historical setting of the Episode; the rhetorical structure of the Episode itself; the context of the scene within the Gospels; and finally, how the Catholic Church, Herself, has understood the Tribute Episode. These dimensions point to one conclusion: the Tribute Episode does not stand for the proposition that it is morally obligatory to pay taxes.

The objective of this piece is not to provide a complete exegesis on the Tribute Episode. Rather, it is simply to show that the traditional, pro-tax interpretation of the Tribute Episode is utterly untenable. The passage unequivocally does not stand for the proposition that Jesus thought it was morally obligatory to pay taxes.


In 6 A.D., Roman occupiers of Palestine imposed a census tax on the Jewish people. The tribute was not well-received, and by 17 A.D., Tacitus reports in Book II.42 of the Annals, "The provinces, too, of Syria and Judaea, exhausted by their burdens, implored a reduction of tribute." A tax-revolt, led by Judas the Galilean, soon ensued. Judas the Galilean taught that "taxation was no better than an introduction to slavery," and he and his followers had "an inviolable attachment to liberty," recognizing God, alone, as king and ruler of Israel. The Romans brutally combated the uprising for decades. Two of Judas’ sons were crucified in 46 A.D., and a third was an early leader of the 66 A.D. Jewish revolt. Thus, payment of the tribute conveniently encapsulated the deeper philosophical, political, and theological issue: Either God and His divine laws were supreme, or the Roman emperor and his pagan laws were supreme.

This undercurrent of tax-revolt flowed throughout Judaea during Jesus’ ministry. All three synoptic Gospels place the episode immediately after Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem in which throngs of people proclaimed Him king, as St. Matthew states, "And when he entered Jerusalem the whole city was shaken and asked, ‘Who is this?’ And the crowds replied, ‘This is Jesus the prophet, from Nazareth in Galilee." All three agree that this scene takes place near the celebration of the Passover, one of the holiest of Jewish feast days. Passover commemorates God’s deliverance of the Israelites from Egyptian slavery and also celebrates the divine restoration of the Israelites to the land of Israel, land then-occupied by the Romans. Jewish pilgrims from throughout Judaea would have been streaming into Jerusalem to fulfill their periodic religious duties at the temple.

Because of the mass of pilgrims, the Roman procurator of Judaea, Pontius Pilate, had also temporarily taken up residence in Jerusalem along with a multitude of troops so as to suppress any religious violence. In her work, Pontius Pilate: The Biography of an Invented Man, Ann Wroe described Pilate as the emperor’s chief soldier, chief magistrate, head of the judicial system, and above all, the chief tax collector. In Book XXXVIII of On the Embassy to Gaius, Philo has depicted Pilate as "cruel," "exceedingly angry," and "a man of most ferocious passions," who had a "habit of insulting people" and murdering them "untried and uncondemned" with the "most grievous inhumanity." Just a few years prior to Jesus’ ministry, the image of Caesar nearly precipitated an insurrection in Jerusalem when Pilate, by cover of night, surreptitiously erected effigies of the emperor on the fortress Antonia, adjoining the Jewish Temple; Jewish law forbade both the creation of graven images and their introduction into holy city of Jerusalem. Pilate averted a bloodbath only by removing the images.

In short, Jerusalem would have been a hot-bed of political and religious fervor, and it is against this background that the Tribute Episode unfolded.


[15] Then the Pharisees going, consulted among themselves how to insnare him in his speech. [16] And they sent to him their disciples with the Herodians, saying: Master, we know that thou art a true speaker and teachest the way of God in truth. Neither carest thou for any man: for thou dost not regard the person of men. [17] Tell us therefore what dost thou think? Is it lawful to give tribute to Caesar, or not? [18] But Jesus knowing their wickedness, said: Why do you tempt me, ye hypocrites? [19] Show me the coin of the tribute. And they offered him a penny [literally, in Latin, "denarium," a denarius]. [20] And Jesus saith to them: Whose image and inscription is this? [21] They say to him: Caesar's. Then he saith to them: Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar's; and to God, the things that are God's. [22] And hearing this, they wondered and, leaving him, went their ways. Matt 22:15–22 (Douay-Rheims translation).


All three synoptic Gospels open the scene with a plot to trap Jesus. The questioners begin with, what is in their minds, false flattery – "Master [or Teacher or Rabbi] we know that you are a true speaker and teach the way of God in truth." As David Owen-Ball forcefully argues in his 1993 article, "Rabbinic Rhetoric and the Tribute Passage," this opening statement is also a challenge to Jesus’ rabbinic authority; it is a halakhic question – a question on a point of religious law. The Pharisees believed that they, alone, were the authoritative interpreters of Jewish law. By appealing to Jesus’ authority to interpret God’s law, the questioners accomplish two goals: (1) they force Jesus to answer the question; if Jesus refuses, He will lose credibility as a Rabbi with the very people who just proclaimed Him a King; and (2) they force Jesus to base this answer in Scripture. Thus, they are testing His scriptural knowledge and hoping to discredit Him if He cannot escape a prima facie intractable interrogatory. As Owen-Ball states, "The gospel writers thus describe a scene in which Jesus’ questioners have boxed him in. He is tempted to assume, illegitimately, the authority of a Rabbi, while at the same time he is constrained to answer according to the dictates of the Torah."

The questioners then pose their malevolently brilliant question: "Is it lawful to give tribute to Caesar, or not?" That is, is it licit under the Torah to pay taxes to the Romans? At some point, Jesus must have led His questioners to believe that He opposed the tribute; otherwise His questioners would not have posed the question in the first instance. As John Howard Yoder argues in his book, The Politics of Jesus: vicit Agnus noster, "It is hard to see how the denarius question could have been thought by those who put it to be a serious trap, unless Jesus’ repudiation of the Roman occupation were taken for granted, so that he could be expected to give an answer which would enable them to denounce him."

If Jesus says that it is lawful to pay the tribute, He would have been seen as a collaborator with the Roman occupiers and would alienate the people who had just proclaimed Him a king. If Jesus says that the tribute is illegitimate, He risked being branded a political criminal and incurring the wrath of Rome. With either answer, someone would have been likely to kill Him.

Jesus immediately recognizes the trap. He exposes the hostility and the hypocrisy of His interrogators and recognizes that His questioners are daring Him to enter the temporal fray of Judeo-Roman politics.


Instead of jumping into the political discussion, though, Jesus curiously requests to see the coin of the tribute. It is not necessary that Jesus possess the coin to answer their question. He could certainly respond without seeing the coin. That He requests to see the coin suggests that there is something meaningful about the coin itself.

In the Tribute Episode, the questioners produce a denarius. The denarius was approximately 1/10 of a troy ounce (at that time about 3.9 grams) of silver and roughly worth a day’s wages for a common laborer. The denarius was a remarkably stable currency; Roman emperors did not begin debasing it with any vigor until Nero. The denarius in question would have been issued by the Emperor Tiberius, whose reign coincided with Jesus’ ministry. Where Augustus issued hundreds of denarii, Ethelbert Stauffer, in his masterful, Christ and the Caesars, reports that Tiberius issued only three, and of those three, two are relatively rare, and the third is quite common. Tiberius preferred this third and issued it from his personal mint for twenty years. The denarius was truly the emperor’s property: he used it to pay his soldiers, officials, and suppliers; it bore the imperial seal; it differed from the copper coins issued by the Roman Senate, and it was also the coin with which subjected peoples, in theory, were required to pay the tribute. Tiberius even made it a capital crime to carry any coin stamped with his image into a bathroom or a brothel. In short, the denarius was a tangible representation of the emperor’s power, wealth, deification, and subjugation.

Tiberius’ denarii were minted at Lugdunum, modern-day Lyons, in Gaul. Thus, J. Spencer Kennard, in a well-crafted, but out-of-print book entitled Render to God, argues that the denarius’ circulation in Judaea was likely scarce. The only people to transact routinely with the denarius in Judaea would have been soldiers, Roman officials, and Jewish leaders in collaboration with Rome. Thus, it is noteworthy that Jesus, Himself, does not possess the coin. The questioners’ quickness to produce the coin at Jesus’ request implies that they routinely used it, taking advantage of Roman financial largess, whereas Jesus did not. Moreover, the Tribute Episode takes place in the Temple, and by producing the coin, the questioners reveal their religious hypocrisy – they bring a potentially profane item, the coin of a pagan, into the sacred space of the Temple.

Finally, both Stauffer and Kennard make the magnificent point that coins of the ancient world were the major instrument of imperial propaganda, promoting agendas and promulgating the deeds of their issuers, in particular the apotheosis of the emperor. As Kennard puts it, "For indoctrinating the peoples of the empire with the deity of the emperor, coins excelled all other media. They went everywhere and were handled by everyone. Their subtle symbolism pervaded every home." While Tiberius’ propaganda engine was not as prolific as Augustus’ machine, all of Tiberius’ denarii pronounced his divinity or his debt to the deified Augustus.


After seeing the coin, Jesus then poses a counter-question, "Whose image and inscription is this?" It is again noteworthy that this counter-question and its answer are not necessary to answer the original question of whether it is licit to pay tribute to Caesar. That Jesus asks the counter-question suggests that it and its answer are significant.

(1) Why Is The Counter-Question Important?

The counter-question is significant for two reasons.

First, Owen-Ball argues that the counter-question follows a pattern of formal rhetoric common in first century rabbinic literature in which (1) an outsider poses a hostile question to a rabbi; (2) the rabbi responds with a counter-question; (3) by answering the counter-question, the outsider’s position becomes vulnerable to attack; and (4) the rabbi then uses the answer to the counter-question to refute the hostile question. Jesus’ use of this rhetorical form is one way to establish His authority as a rabbi, not unlike a modern lawyer who uses a formal, legal rhetoric in the courtroom. Moreover, the point of the rhetorical exchange is ultimately to refute the hostile question.

Second, because the hostile question was a direct challenge to Jesus’ authority as a rabbi on a point of law, His interrogators would have expected a counter-question grounded in scripture, in particular, based upon the Torah. Two words, "image" and "inscription," in the counter-question harkens to two central provisions in the Torah, the First (Second) Commandment and the Shema. These provide the scriptural basis for this question of law.

God Prohibits False Images. The First (Second) Commandment prohibits worship of anyone or anything but God, and it also forbids crafting any image of a false god for adoration, "I am the Lord thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. Thou shalt not have strange gods before me. Thou shalt not make to thyself a graven thing, nor the likeness [image] of any thing…." God demands the exclusive allegiance of His people. Jesus’ use of the word, "image," in the counter-question reminds His questioners of the First (Second) Commandment’s requirement to venerate God first and its concomitant prohibition against creating images of false gods.

The Shema Demands The Worship Of God Alone. Jesus’ use of the word "inscription" alludes to the Shema. The Shema is a Jewish prayer based upon Deuteronomy 6:4–9, 11:13–21 and Numbers 15:37–41 and is the most important prayer a pious Jew can say. It commences with the words, "Shema Yisrael Adonai Eloheinu Adonai Echad," which can be translated, "Hear, O Israel, the Lord is our God – the Lord alone." This opening line stresses Israel’s worship of God to the exclusion of all other gods. The Shema then commands a person to love God with his whole heart, whole soul, and whole strength. The Shema further requires worshipers to keep the words of the Shema in their hearts, to instruct their children in them, to bind them on their hands and foreheads, and to inscribe them conspicuously on their doorposts and on the gates to their cities. Observant Jews take literally the command to bind the words upon their arms and foreheads and wear tefillin, little leather cases which contain parchment on which are inscribed certain passages from the Torah. Words of the Shema were to be metaphorically inscribed in the hearts, minds, and souls of pious Jews and physically inscribed on parchment in tefillin, on doorposts, and on city gates. St. Matthew and St. Mark both recount Jesus quoting the Shema in the same chapter just a few verses after the Tribute Episode. This proximity further reinforces the reference to the Shema in the Tribute Episode. Finally, it is noteworthy that when Satan tempts Jesus by offering Him all the kingdoms of the [Roman] world in exchange for His worship, Jesus rebukes Satan by quoting the Shema. In short, Jesus means to call attention to the Shema by using the word "inscription" in the counter-question as His appeal to scriptural authority for His response.

(2) Why Is The Answer To The Counter-Question Important?

The answer to the counter-question is significant for two reasons.

First, while the verbal answer to the counter-question of whose image and inscription the coin bears is a feeble, "Caesar’s," the actual image and inscription is much more revealing. The front of the denarius shows a profiled bust of Tiberius crowned with the laurels of victory and divinity. Even a modern viewer would immediately recognize that the person depicted on the coin is a Roman emperor. Circumscribed around Tiberius is an abbreviation, "TI CAESAR DIVI AUG F AUGUSTUS," which stands for "Tiberius Caesar Divi August Fili Augustus," which, in turn, translates, "Tiberius Caesar, Worshipful Son of the God, Augustus."

On the obverse sits the Roman goddess of peace, Pax, and circumscribed around her is the abbreviation, "Pontif Maxim," which stands for "Pontifex Maximus," which, in turn, means, "High Priest."

The coin of the Tribute Episode is a fine specimen of Roman propaganda. It imposes the cult of emperor worship and asserts Caesar’s sovereignty upon all who transact with it.

In the most richly ironic passage in the entire Bible, all three synoptic Gospels depict the Son of God and the High Priest of Peace, newly-proclaimed by His people to be a King, holding the tiny silver coin of a king who claims to be the son of a god and the high priest of Roman peace.

The second reason the answer is significant is that in following the pattern of rabbinic rhetoric, the answer exposes the hostile questioners’ position to attack. It is again noteworthy that the interrogators’ answer to Jesus’ counter-question about the coin’s image and inscription bears little relevance to their original question as to whether it is licit to pay the tribute. Jesus could certainly answer their original question without their answer to His counter-question. But the rhetorical function of the answer to the counter-question is to demonstrate the vulnerability of the opponent’s position and use that answer to refute the opponent’s original, hostile question.


In the Tribute Episode, it is only after Jesus’ counter-question is asked and answered does He respond to the original question. Jesus tells His interrogators, "Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s; and to God, the things that are God’s." This response begs the question of what is licitly God’s and what is licitly Caesar’s.

In the Hebrew tradition, everything rightfully belonged to God. By using the words, "image and inscription," Jesus has already reminded His interrogators that God was owed exclusive allegiance and total love and worship. Similarly, everything economically belonged to God as well. For example, the physical land of Israel was God’s, as He instructed in Leviticus 25:23, "The land [of Israel] shall not be sold in perpetuity; for the land is mine, and you [the Israelites] are but aliens who have become my tenants." In addition, the Jewish people were to dedicate the firstfruits, that first portion of any harvest and the first-born of any animal, to God. By giving God the firstfruits, the Jewish people acknowledged that all good things came from God and that all things, in turn, belonged to God. God even declares, "Mine is the silver and mine the gold."

The emperor, on the other hand, also claimed that all people and things in the empire rightfully belonged to Rome. The denarius notified everyone who transacted with it that the emperor demanded exclusive allegiance and, at least, the pretense of worship – Tiberius claimed to be the worshipful son of a god. Roman occupiers served as a constant reminder that the land of Israel belonged to Rome. Roman tribute, paid with Roman currency, impressed upon the populace that the economic life depended on the emperor. The emperor’s bread and circuses maintained political order. The propaganda on the coin even attributed peace and tranquility to the emperor.

With one straightforward counter-question, Jesus skillfully points out that the claims of God and Caesar are mutually exclusive. If one’s faith is in God, then God is owed everything; Caesar’s claims are necessarily illegitimate, and he is therefore owed nothing. If, on the other hand, one’s faith is in Caesar, God’s claims are illegitimate, and Caesar is owed, at the very least, the coin which bears his image.

Jesus’ counter-question simply invites His listeners to choose allegiances. Remarkably, He has escaped the trap through a clever rhetorical gambit; He has authoritatively refuted His opponents’ hostile question by basing His answer in scripture, and yet, He never overtly answers the question originally posed to Him. No wonder that St. Matthew ends the Tribute Episode this way: "When they heard this they were amazed, and leaving him they went away."


Subtle sedition refers to scenes throughout the Gospels which were not overtly treasonous and would not have directly threatened Roman authorities, but which delivered political messages that first century Jewish audiences would have immediately recognized. The Gospels are replete with instances of subtle sedition. Pointing these out is not to argue that Jesus saw Himself as a political king. Jesus makes it explicit in John 18:36 that He is not a political Messiah. Rather, in the context of subtle sedition, no one can interpret the Tribute Episode as Jesus’ support of taxation. To the contrary, one can only understand the Tribute Episode as Jesus’ opposition to the illicit Roman taxes.

In addition to the Tribute Episode, three other scenes from the Gospels serve as examples of subtle sedition: (1) Jesus’ temptation in the desert; (2) Jesus walking on water; and (3) Jesus curing the Gerasene demoniac.


Around 200 A.D., the Roman satirist Juvenal lamented that the Roman emperors, masters of the known world, tenuously maintained political power by way of "panem et circenses," or "bread and circuses," a reference to the ancient practice of pandering to Roman citizens by providing free wheat and costly circus spectacles. Caesar Augustus, for example, boasted of feeding more than 100,000 men from his personal granary. He also bragged of putting on tremendous exhibitions:

Three times I gave shows of gladiators under my name and five times under the name of my sons and grandsons; in these shows about 10,000 men fought. * * * Twenty-six times, under my name or that of my sons and grandsons, I gave the people hunts of African beasts in the circus, in the open, or in the amphitheater; in them about 3,500 beasts were killed. I gave the people a spectacle of a naval battle, in the place across the Tiber where the grove of the Caesars is now, with the ground excavated in length 1,800 feet, in width 1,200, in which thirty beaked ships, biremes or triremes, but many smaller, fought among themselves; in these ships about 3,000 men fought in addition to the rowers.

By the time of Jesus and the reign of Tiberius Caesar, the Roman grain dole routinely fed 200,000 people.

At the beginning of Jesus’ ministry, the Spirit led Him into the desert "to be tempted by the devil." The devil challenged Him with three tests. First, he dared Jesus to turn stones into bread. Second, the devil took Jesus to the highest point on the temple in Jerusalem and tempted Him to cast Himself down to force the angels into a spectacular, miraculous rescue. Finally, for the last temptation, "the devil took him up to a very high mountain, and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in their magnificence, and he said to him, ‘All these I shall give to you, if you will prostrate yourself and worship me.’"

The devil dared Jesus to be a king of bread and circuses and offered Him dominion over the whole earthly world. These temptations are an instantly recognizable reference to the power of the Roman emperors. Jesus forcefully rejects this power. Jesus’ rejection illustrates that the things of God and the things of Rome/the world/the devil are mutually exclusive. Jesus’ allegiance was to the things of God, and His rebuff of the metaphorical power of Rome is an example of subtle sedition.


At the beginning of Chapter 6 in St. John’s Gospel, Jesus performs a miracle and feeds 5,000 people from five loaves of bread; He then refuses to be crowned a king of bread and circuses. Immediately thereafter, St. John recounts the episode of Jesus walking on a body of water in the middle of a storm. That body of water was the Sea of Galilee, which, St. John reminds his readers, was also known as the Sea of Tiberias. Around 25 A.D., Herod Antipas built a pagan city on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee and named it in honor of the Roman emperor, Tiberius. By Jesus’ time, the city had become so important that the Sea of Galilee came to be called the "Sea of Tiberias." Thus, not only does Jesus refuse to be coronated a Roman king of bread and circuses, but He literally treads upon the emperor’s seas, showing that even the emperor’s waters have no dominion over Him. Treading on the emperor’s seas is an additional instance of subtle sedition.


St. Mark details Jesus’ encounter with the Gerasene demoniac in another example of subtle sedition. The territory of the Gerasenes was pagan territory, and this particular demoniac was exceptionally strong and frightening. In attempting to exorcise the demon, Jesus asked its name. The demon replied, "Legion is my name. There are many of us." Jesus then expels the demons and casts them into a herd of swine. The herd immediately drive themselves into the sea. First century readers would have been well-acquainted with the name, "Legion." At that time, an imperial legion was roughly 6,000 soldiers. Thus, the demon "Legion," an agent of the devil, was a thinly-veiled reference to the Roman occupiers of Judaea. Swine were considered unclean animals under Jewish law. The symbol of the Roman Legion which occupied Jerusalem was a boar. The first century audience would have easily grasped the symbolism of Jesus’ casting the demon Legion into the herd of unclean swine, and the herd driving itself into the sea. Thus, the healing of the Gerasene demoniac is another example of subtle sedition.


In the Tribute Episode, Jesus’ response is subtly seditious. The first-century audience would have immediately apprehended what it meant to render unto God the things that are God’s. They would have known that the things of God and Caesar were mutually exclusive. No Jewish listener would have mistaken Jesus’ response as an endorsement of paying Caesar’s taxes. To the contrary, His audience would have understood that Jesus thought the tribute was illicit. Indeed, opposition to the tribute was one of the charges the authorities levied at His trial, "They brought charges against him, saying, ‘We found this man misleading our people; he opposes the payment of taxes to Caesar and maintains that he is the Messiah, a king.’" To the Roman audience, however, the pronouncement of rendering unto Caesar what is Caesar’s sounds benign, almost supportive. It is, however, one of many vignettes of covert political protest contained in the Gospels. In short, the Tribute Episode is a subtle form of sedition. When viewed in this context, no one can say that the Episode supports the payment of taxes.


The Catholic Church considers Herself the authoritative interpreter of Sacred Scripture. The 1994 Catechism of the Catholic Church "is a statement of the Church’s faith and of catholic doctrine, attested to or illumined by Sacred Scripture, the Apostolic Tradition, and the Church’s Magisterium."

The 1994 Catechism instructs the faithful that it is morally obligatory to pay one’s taxes for the common good. (What the definition of the "common good" is may be left for a different debate.) The 1994 Catechism also quotes and cites the Tribute Episode. But the 1994 Catechism does NOT use the Tribute Episode to support the proposition that it is morally obligatory to pay taxes. Instead, the 1994 Catechism refers the Tribute Episode only to justify acts of civil disobedience. It quotes St. Matthew’s version to teach that a Christian must refuse to obey political authority when that political authority makes a demand contrary to the demands of the moral order, the fundamental rights of persons, or the teachings of the Gospel. Similarly, the 1994 Catechism also cites to St. Mark’s version to instruct that a person "should not submit his personal freedom in an absolute manner to any earthly power, but only to God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ: Caesar is not ‘the Lord.’" Thus, according to the 1994 Catechism, the Tribute Episode stands for the proposition that a Christian owes his allegiance to God and to the things of God alone. If the Tribute Episode unequivocally supported the proposition that it is morally obligatory to pay taxes, the 1994 Catechism would not hesitate to cite to it for that position. That the 1994 Catechism does not interpret the Tribute Episode as a justification for the payment of taxes suggests that such an interpretation is not an authoritative reading of the passage. In short, even the Catholic Church does not understand the Tribute Episode to mean that Jesus endorsed paying Caesar’s taxes.


St. John’s Gospel recounts the scene of a woman caught in adultery, brought before Jesus by the Pharisees so that they might "test" Him "so that they could have some charge to bring against Him." When asked, "‘Teacher, this woman was caught in the very act of committing adultery. Now in the law, Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say,’" Jesus appears trapped by only two answers: the strict, legally-correct answer of the Pharisees, or the mercifully-right, morally-correct, but technically-illegal answer undermining Jesus’ authority as a Rabbi. Notably, Jesus never does overtly respond to the question posed to Him; instead of answering, "Jesus bent down and began to write on the ground with his finger." When pressed by His inquisitors, He finally answers, "‘Let the one among you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her,’" and, of course, the shamed Pharisees all leave one by one. Jesus then refuses to condemn the woman.

The scene of the woman caught in adultery and the Tribute Episode are similar. In both, Jesus is faced with a hostile question challenging His credibility as a Rabbi. In each, the hostile question has two answers: one answer which the audience knows is morally correct, but politically incorrect, and the other answer which the audience knows is wrong, but politically correct. In the scene of the woman caught in adultery, no one roots for Jesus to say, "Stone her!" Everyone wants to see Jesus extend the woman mercy. Likewise, in the Tribute Episode, no one hopes Jesus answers, "Pay tribute to the pagan, Roman oppressors!" The Tribute Episode, like the scene of the woman caught in adultery, has a "right" answer – it is not licit to pay the tribute. But Jesus cannot give this "right" answer without running afoul of the Roman government. Instead, in both Gospel accounts, Jesus gives a quick-witted, but ultimately ambiguous, response which exposes the hypocrisy of His interrogators rather than overtly answers the underlying question posed by them. Nevertheless, in each instance, the audience can infer the right answer embedded in Jesus’ response.

Over the centuries, theologians, scholars, laymen, and potentates have interpreted the Tribute Episode incorrectly as Jesus’ support for the payment of taxes. First, this interpretation does not square with the political climate of the times. The Tribute Episode is set in the middle of a decades-old tax-revolt against Caesar’s tribute. Second, the rhetorical structure of the Tribute Episode, itself, contradicts any interpretation that Jesus supported paying taxes. Third, the Gospels contain episode after episode of subtle sedition. The Tribute Episode is just another of these subtly seditious scenes. When seen in the context of subtle sedition, the phrase "Render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s," means that the emperor is owed nothing. Finally, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the authoritative interpreter of Sacred Scripture, does not construe the Tribute Episode to support the proposition that it is morally obligatory to pay one’s taxes. Indeed, it interprets the Tribute Episode to mean the exact opposite – that Christians are obliged to disobey Caesar when Caesar’s dictates violate God’s law. In sum, the pro-tax position of the Tribute Episode is not supportable historically, rhetorically, contextually, or within the confines of the Catholic Church’s own understanding. As Dorothy Day is reputed to have said, "If we rendered unto God all the things that belong to God, there would be nothing left for Caesar."

March 17, 2010

Jeff Barr [send him mail] practices law in Las Vegas, Nevada. He received a Master's Degree in Business Administration from UNLV where he took classes from Hans-Hermann Hoppe and Murray Rothbard.

PS. THIS government committed atrocities (think Shay's rebellion, Whiskey rebellion, "Civil "war (war of northern aggression)) LONG before there were corporations which are government creations in the first place. Wonderfully smart of you to make that distinction.

And then he really wrote this:

The reading of scripture is complex and we should avoid being sure that it supports our cherished assumptions.

To which I wrote the seeming last shot:

Yeah, XXX, THAT'S what "we" are doing. You are a joke, a perfect example of cognitive dissonance and a statist whore. I'm considering making this entire dialog available to the world.